Thème I

Theme I

  

Integrated Forest and Industry Strategies for the Modern Bioeconomy

This research theme addresses the frameworks and planning tools required for the strategic design of the forest bioeconomy. There are two main issues that need to be addressed. The first of these is: how does a value chain perspective change the approaches of wood supplies that result from long-term sustainable forest management (SFM)? Much of the strategic analysis in the past has been aimed at total wood volumes with little regard to the requirements of the supply chain (e.g., volume versus value). The second involves strategies for appropriate investments in processing capacity in both the traditional solid wood and fibre products, and in the advanced wood products, green fibre products, biofuels and biochemicals, that will characterize the new forest bioeconomy. Strategic design of the supply chain is about more than choices of facilities and locations. It is about deciding what the fundamental value proposition is in terms of products and markets and how the resources available can be directed to meeting these markets. It requires the capability to analyze issues of capacity, location and resource availability; the ability to examine strategies of information gathering and sharing; and the structuring of collaborations all along the chain. At the strategic level the world is fundamentally uncertain, and different enterprises will legitimately choose different approaches. Thus, the goal of research in Theme 1 is not to prescribe strategy for the decision-makers but to provide the tools that will allow them to explore the range of alternative policy options and the consequences associated with them.

The Canadian Commitment to Sustainable Forest Management prepared the document A Vision for Canada’s Forests 2008 and Beyond using a different focus. The Vision highlights two current priorities of national importance, both of which require innovative policies and actions: forest sector transformation and climate change. Forest sector transformation is needed to maintain a prosperous and sustainable future for Canada’s entire forest sector. Climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies will reduce the effects of climate change on forests and communities.

 

 

 M.Sc. Projects


1.7 Determining an Effective Computational Environment to combine forest treatments, CCFM C&I and the Value Chain? - Completed
Student
Andrew Martin
Director 
Evelyn Richards
University  
University of New Brunswick

1.14 The effect of management intensity zoning on forest value chains -  Completed
Student 
Tevfik Ziya Kuloglu
Director  
Glen Armstrong
University   
University of Alberta

1.20 Strategic management of flammable boreal forest landscape that are subject to storm damage -  In progress
Student 
Juliana Kostrinsky
Director  
David Martell
University   
University of Toronto

 Ph.D. Projects


1.1 The Need for Spatial Detail in Strategic Forest Management Planning - Stopped
Student 
Jason Myers
Director  
David Martell
University   
University of Toronto

1.2 Policy and legislation to facilitate development of Canada's forest based Bioeconomy - In progress
Student 
Peter Milley
Jean Blair
Director  
Warren Mabee
University   
Queen's University

1.3 Competitive Analysis for Economically Sustainable Value Chains Resulting from Transformative Business Strategies - In progress
Student 
CĂ©dric Diffo
Director  
Paul Stuart
University    
École Polyetchnique de Montréal
1.4 Optimal Facility Location and Supply Chain Design for the BC Coastal Forest Sector using Agent-Based Integrated Production Modeling - Completed
Student 
Saba Vahid
Director  
John Nelson
University    
University of British Columbia

1.13 What is the consequence of natural disturbance on the design of the forest industry in a particular region? How should natural disturbance affect industry design? - In Progress
Student 
Baburam Rijal
Director  
Frédéric Raulier
University    
Université Laval

1.17 What are the benefits and risks associated with tightly integrated industry structure. What can one do in the design of the industry to mitigate the risk of uncorrelated final product markets? - In progress
Student
Narges Sereshti
Director
Eldon Gunn
University
Dalhousie University

1.21 Robust Network Design for Forest Biorefinery Value Chain – decisions support systems for the transformation of the Canadian forest industry - In progress
Student
Foroogh Abasian
Director
Mustapha Ouhimmou
University
Université Laval

PDF Projects


1.22 How do we reconcile sustainable forest management of the boreal forest with the logistics and transportation considerations necessary for sustainable forest industry? - In progress
Student
Jonathan Ruppert
Director
David Martell
University
University of Toronto

 Internship Projects


1.1 WP Analysis Capabilities for Strategic Forest Management for a Sustainable Value Chain - Completed
Student 
Maria Vasardani
Director  
Eldon Gunn
University    
Dalhousie University

Research Professional Projects


1.8 Design of advanced strategic optimization tools for very large-scale joint optimization of forest treatment, landscape management and markets. In progress
Professional
Hakim Ouzennou
Director
Frédéric Raulier
University
Université Laval

 Associate Student Projects


1.24AS Synchronizing long- and short-term forest management planning processes
Student 
Gregory Paradis
Director  
Luc LeBel
University    
Université Laval

1.25AS Socio-Economic Impacts of Woody Biomass Based Bioenergy Development at the Atikokan Power Generating Station: Local Perceptions and Public Opinions
Student
Cassia Sanzida
Baten

Director
Reino Pulkki
University
Lakehead University

1.26AS Biomass for bioenergy from managed forests through the value chain: Modelling availability as a function of ecological and industrial drivers - In progress
Student
Nicolas Mansuy
Director
Evelyn Thiffault
Canadian Forest Services

 

 

 

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